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Not Touristy Venice

Ponte dei Pugni, San Barnaba and San Trovaso

Ponte dei Pugni Since the 13th century Venice was famously divided between two rival factions: the Castellani, who wore a red hat and scarf, representing Eastern Venice and the Nicolotti, with a black hat and scarf, representing the Western part of the city. To settle a major religious dispute in the Middle-Ages, they planned to meet…

San Pantalon and Santa Margherita

San Pantalon Here we are in Campo San Pantalon, with the church dedicated to Saint Pantaleon, a priest who was martyred in the 3rd century for trying to convert people to Christianity in Anatolia, or modern Turkey. The brick-façade gives it an air of simplicity, completely opposite to its interior, which holds the largest painting…

Sant’Aponal and Ponte delle Tette

Sant’Aponal Entering Campo Sant’Aponal, at the centre we see a typical Venetian well in Istrian stone. The Church of Sant’Aponal dates back to the 11th century, although the austere-looking façade a typical example of byzantine gothic architecture of the 15th century, when the whole structure was almost entirely rebuilt. From 1810 to 1851 the church was…

San Tomà, Goldoni’s House and San Polo

San Tomà In Campo San Tomà we find the usual Venetian well-head where, until not so long ago, locals would come to collect clean water, which was certainly not easy to find in this marshy environment. The windowless church is steeped in mystery, and very few Venetians know what’s inside since it has been closed for…

San Nicola da Tolentino and Frari

San Nicola da Tolentino Campo San Nicola da Tolentino, usually known as the Tolentini, is a popular spot for university students and workers who wish to relax after a long day with a prosecco on the steps of the church, looking out onto the open space before the canal. The inside is one of the most…

Campo delle Beccarie, San Giovanni Elemosinario and San Giacometto

Campo delle Beccarie Campo delle Beccarie, this is one of the many parts of the Rialto market, the economic force of the Venetian Republic, a little like one might think of Wall Street in New York today; it was the area where butchers came to collect, cut and sell their meat. “Bechèr” is in fact Venetian…

Campo San Zan Degola’ and Calle dei Boteri

Campo San Zan Degola’ Here we are in Campo San Giovanni Decollato, and this is as secret as Venice gets; if you ask a Venetian directions to get here, he probably won’t be able to help you since he’ll know it as San Zan Degolà. Whether in Italian or Venetian, the name refers to St….

Campo San Giacomo dell’Orio and Campo Santa Maria Mater Domini

Campo San Giacomo dell’Orio Enter in the serene atmosphere of Campo San Giacomo dell’Orio. The church is one of the most ancient in Venice and one of most oriental too, with its Byzantine plump apses and warm colours looking out.  Among the rare treasures is a green marble pillar which came back from Constantinople during…

The Bridge of Scalzi and The Church of San Geremia

The Bridge of Scalzi The Bridge of Scalzi, literally of the barefoot, is named after the Church of the Scalzi located on the left. It is curious to think that the spacious and empty fondamenta where boats stop today was once populated by splendid palaces and churches; all of which were torn down to make…

San Rocco and the Bridge of the Constitution

San Rocco From the 14th century, the plague was a frequent occurrence in Venice as in many other parts of Europe, and on three occasions over the following two centuries it decimated the city’s population. Since neither the cause nor the cure were known, Venetians believed God was punishing them and so they would turn…

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